"It is not in the epistles we learn the fundamentals. We shall find those necessary points best in the preaching of our Savior." (John LockeĀ (1696).)

Relevant

A Joomla! Template for the Rest of Us

 

Search

Questions?

Please enter your questions, and we will get back to you as soon as possible. As an anti-spam measure, we ask that you re-type the code you see in the box below, prior to clicking "Send Message"






Roman Catholicism

Living with Contradictions Over Mary

Vatican II affirmed that there is but one Redeemer and one Mediator but it was self-contradictory:

“Therefore the Blessed Virgin is invoked by the Church under the titles of Advocate, Auxiliatrix, Adjutrix and Mediatrix. This, however, is to be so understood that it neither takes away from, nor adds anything to, the dignity and efficaciousness of Christ the one Mediator.” (Lumen Gentium, n. 62.)

First Pope

The first bishop of Rome was not Peter, but Linus. Rufinus made mention of this in his preface to the Recognitions of Clement. Clement later received the episcopate from Peter, but Linus was first bishop of Rome beforehand. Rufinus reconciles them by saying Peter in each instance simply allowed another to have the title of Bishop and Peter kept the title of apostle, just as well known was Peter's practice at Caesarea with Zacchaeus. Thus, the myth of Peter as the first bishop is just that -- a myth:

The epistle in which the same Clement, writing to James the Lord's brother, informs him of the death of Peter, and that he [Peter] had left him his successor in his chair and teaching, and in which also the whole subject of church order is treated, I have not prefixed to this work, both because it is of later date, and because I have already translated and published it.4 But I do not think it out of place to explain here what in that letter will perhaps seem to some to be inconsistent. For some ask, Since Linus and Cletus were bishops in the city of Rome before this Clement, how could Clement himself, writing to James, say that the chair of teaching was handed over to him by Peter?5 Now of this we have heard this explanation, that Linus and Cletus were indeed bishops in the city of Rome before Clement, but during the lifetime of Peter: that is, that they undertook the care of the episcopate, and that he fulfilled the office of apostleship; as is found also to have been the case at Caesarea, where, when he himself was present, he yet had Zacchaeus, ordained by himself, as bishop. And in this way both statements will appear to be true, both that these bishops are reckoned before Clement, and yet that Clement received the teacher's seat on the death of Peter. But now let us see how Clement, writing to James the Lord's brother, begins his narrative. (Bishop Rufinus, Introduction.)